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I was wondering if there is a blowoff valve for the redline. I know there is universal ones. I don't know what size to get can someone help me? I was hopping to get a hks or a vortech. Thanks for reading
 

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should've searched...

blowoff valves are for turbocharged cars, our cars have a bypass valve, which is good up until after 13psi is reached lower in the RPMs, you can do a search on google and you'll find some bypass valves that vent to the atmosphere, but like i said, they are uneeded until you're getting more PSI out of the system, and i'm not sure exactly how efficient ours is, so it could be good for more than that
 

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trying using the search button, there are some old threads about bov's with good discussion why they wont apply
 

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Would an HKS bypass valve make the same cool noise as a Blow-Off vavle does?
 

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korax123 said:
Would an HKS bypass valve make the same cool noise as a Blow-Off vavle does?
No, the blow off valve is letting a surge of power out of the turbo because it lags behind the engine it terms of it's effects, and you don't want the turbo's pressure getting in the way of dropping RPMs when you jam the clutch in. The bypass valve in our superchargers is skipping the supercharger, not blowing pressure out of it. You have a bypass valve that opens up all the time when you're driving around town, but instead of blowing off the pressure, it's stopping the supercharger from making more by routing the air around it and into the engine. Someone correct me if I'm wrong here..



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I've said it once i'll say it again, three words: venting bypass valve. :D
 

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I was looking at racing by-pass valves. Does any one know what would happen if i were to put a universal racing by-pass valve on my Rl? Would i benifit from this in anyway?
 

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BoKaThUg1 said:
I was looking at racing by-pass valves. Does any one know what would happen if i were to put a universal racing by-pass valve on my Rl? Would i benifit from this in anyway?
The only gain to putting an upgraded Bypass/DV/BOV on a FI car be it SC or Turbo would be if your stock valve is failing to hold pressure. Most people do it just for the noise it makes...
 

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when we up the boost it'll help, but i'm sure ours is good for quite a bit of pressure. they say anything above 12psi though,

check this out

also, it's very informative to look into the tech section of that site, VERY informative! happy reading!
 

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The blow off valve "woosh" or "wistle" that is heard on turbo cars occurs when the throttle blades close and there is a large spike in boost pressure just ahead of the throttle body due to the turbo still making boost. The BOV is opened using vacuum from the back side of the throttle and you hear the "woosh" of air coming out of the charge pipe before the throttle body. This is "if" it has a bypass valve and if it is vented to atmosphere, or if it has an aftermarket blow off valve.

Now, on a roots type supercharger all of the components that create boost are behind the throttle. When the supercharger is at full boost and the throttle is closed the intake immediatly switches to a negative pressure due to the motor still rotating and the rotors go from rotating with a load on one side to rotating in a vacuum. There is no pressure build up inside of the intake after the supercharger after the throttle closes because the supercharger cannot pull in any more air to compress. The bypass valve that is built into the M62 is there to regulate and balance vacuum on both sides of the supercharger at idle and regulate "on throttle" or "full throttle" boost pressures in the intake.

So,basicly what I am saying is if you want a BOV that makes noise you might need to ad a turbo or look for a turbo car because they will not work on the stock set up of the RL.

The BOV's mentioned in the link above are for "centrifigual" superchargers that generate boost before the throttle body. Also, that article is written very vauge and dose not specify what superchargers benifit and witch do not. Remember there are three types superchargers, centrigigual,roots and screw.

The roots application on our RL's will not work with a blow off valve.
 

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Sp00ner said:
Yea, and those Vortech style cent superchargers are damn near turbos... the characteristics are VERY similar.
Similar in appearance because of the scrolled compressor housing but there are drastic differences when you look close at the two. That and the general design is older than dirt. Here is a tid bit from Superchargersonline about the centrifugal supercharger:


The Centrifugal Supercharger
Although the centrifugal supercharger is founded on a technology much newer than either the roots or the twin screw, it was the first supercharger to be successfully applied to automotive applications. Unlike the roots, the centrifugal supercharger is NOT a positive displacement / fixed displacement supercharger because it does not move a fixed volume of air per revolution. The centrifugal supercharger essentially operates like a high speed fan propeller / impeller, sucking air into the center of the supercharger and pushing it to the outside of the rapidly spinning (40,000 + rpm) impeller blades. The air naturally travels to the outside of the blades because of its centrifugal force created by its rotating inertia. At the outside of the blades, a "scroll" is waiting to catch the air molecules. Just before entering the scroll, the air molecules are forced to travel through a venturi, which creates the internal compression. As the air travels around the scroll, the diameter of the scroll increases, which slows the velocity of the air, but further increases its pressure.

The centrifugal supercharger enjoys several advantageous characteristics that make it the most popular supercharger design in the aftermarket world. First, it is simple and reliable because it has very few moving parts - just a few gears and the impeller. Second, the centrifugal supercharger produces very little heat because of its internal compression ratio. It is also small in size and very versatile because it can "free-wheel" and allow the engine to suck air through it or even flow air backwards. For this reason it can be placed anywhere in the intake tract - it can even "blow through" the throttle body, meaning it can be mounted nearly anywhere. It is also the most thermally efficient supercharger, meaning that it produces the lowest discharge temperature.

The only significant disadvantage of the centrifugal supercharger is that it must be spinning at a relatively high speed before it begins to make a significant amount of boost. For this reason, it is not helpful in creating boost (and power) at low engine rpms. Normally the supercharger only begins to create boost at around 3000 rpm, and the boost curve gradually and increasingly rises with engine RPM. Many centrifugal superchargers do not have a self-lubricating oil system, and draw oil from the engine's oil supply. The disadvantage to this is that you must tap the oil pan for the oil return line. However, in doing so, the supercharger becomes virtually maintenance free. Some manufacturers make a "self-contained" centrifugal supercharger that is self-lubricated like roots and twin screw superchargers.
 
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